Archive for the 'Customer Satisfaction' Category

In 2009, I wrote an article about how United Airlines broke a singer’s guitar by mishandling his baggage and refused to pay for the damage. He wrote a song about it and it went viral, causing United to reverse its decision and a public relations nightmare for the company. Normally customer dissatisfaction of that magnitude should cause financial hardship to a company unless they change their policies.

The Temkin Group has released a free ebook called The 6 Laws of Customer Experience which is an excellent read.

When it comes down to it, the most effective tool any client service representative has in his or her arsenal is an apology. We live in a culture of finger pointing and excuses that make a simple “I am so sorry” a refreshing and genuine way to conduct business. But what happens when the problem is not our fault?

Instagram sparks User Revolt and Lawsuit

Thursday, January 10th, 2013

Instagram, a photo sharing app, caused a user revolt when it changed its terms and conditions, claiming it could sell user photos without compensation. A lawsuit was also filed based on the restriction about users right to sue, also changed in the terms and conditions revision.

A new study called The State of Social Customer Service 2012 was recently released by NM Incite, a joint venture between Nielsen and McKinsey & Company. It highlights the importance of organizations providing social media users with prompt customer service through the social media the customers prefer to use, mostly Facebook and Twitter.

Most Popular Blog Articles for 2012

Thursday, January 3rd, 2013

Here are the most read posts in 2012 from the Customer Satisfaction and Reputation Management blog based on reader statistics. Two lists, those that were popular in the last 90 days and those in the top read list for the year that missed being in the last 90 day list.

Toyota’s problems with unintended acceleration of its vehicles culminated with a $1.1 Billion USD settlement of a class action lawsuit in Dec 2012. Call it the cost of customer dissatisfaction.

Front line staff know what customers want. If your front line staff are turning away customers by the hundreds or thousands because you don’t stock certain ‘in demand’ items at Christmas, you will not only lose sales but also good will and loyalty.

Many large organizations have a complaint system in addition to a customer service organization. It is designed to handle the situations where the customer is dissatisfied with the service he received and wants to take the problem to a higher level of management. The complaint department’s responsibility is to listen carefully to the customer’s service complaint, to resolve it or explain why it cannot be resolved in a way that leaves the customer ‘less dissatisfied’. A closed complaint does not mean the customer is satisfied,even if the customer’s request was granted. Here’s an example.

I recently experienced a frustrating interaction with a Customer Service department that was rendered ineffective because it depended on feedback from staff it could not control. My luggage was lost somewhere during a 2 connection flight on 2 different airlines. The worldwide tracking tool was supposed to provide me and the customer service department regular updates on the status of my delayed bag. While the bag did finally show up (damaged) the tracking tool was not updated as it should have been leading to severe anxiety on my part (the customer) and multiple calls to a customer service organization (unproductive use of the call center). There are important lessons to be learned from this failed process.

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